Stephanie Hill #35

Autism: A mum determined to unlock her son so he can live an independent life.

Dyslexia Explored #35

Stephanie Hill

Stephanie Hill

Listen to the talk while on the go from your favorite podcast app or click here to listen to this episode from iTunes. Don’t forget to leave reviews while your at it.

What do you do when you discover your autistic child’s gibberish means “Please be happy. I’m so sorry.”? When a therapist records your 5-yr old child’s gibberish and slows it down so much you can actually hear the words. What do you do when you realize your child is locked in their mind trying to communicate but can’t?

In this episode, we are going to make a little departure from our normal topic of dyslexia and talk about autism. Autism and dyslexia are different, but I just could not pass up the opportunity to speak with Stephanie and hear this story. As parents of dyslexics, although our children challenges are different, the challenges for us as parents can be similar.

In this episode, I’d like to introduce you to Stephanie Hill, a single mom and former secondary school teacher of English and Spanish, who lives in Las Vegas Nevada.

Stephanie is going to share her autism story, which is quite extreme. For example, her son has received 1000+ hours of tutoring over 12 years at a cost of over $400,000 and a large part of which Stephanie has had to find herself. This is just a small indication of the challenges faced in this story.

For our regular listeners, this episode really gets to the heart of a parents challenge. The parenting lessons and insights are universal to everyone who has a child with extra needs.

She talks about how in the beginning he was meeting all the milestones and being responsive even beginning to speak and say ‘mama’ but something happened at 14 months and he started to shut down. She knew something was wrong. She lived in denial for a year, until a friend had the courage to say “maybe he needs tested for autism”.

She tells the story of the diagnosis at three years old and then the beginning of the treatment. Waking up to the reality that he had 100% chance of being institutionalized for the rest of his life if he didn’t get interventions.

She shares her story of how she has spent the last 12 years determined to give him the best outcome using interventions such as Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA).

The five year process of systematically helping him gain language at the age of 8 yrs. Year after year of working through Ecolalia, gibberish, mono syllabic, scrambled syntax to the point where he gained language and was free to communicate. Stephanie shares the example of when they recording him speaking in gibberish and slowed it down so they could understand him and discovered he was saying “Please be happy. I’m so sorry.” How do you process that as a parent? How do you push on with interventions? How do you find the right balance? She shares her inner struggle with this.

This is a story a mum determined to help unlock her son so he can communicate and live independently.

And she shares about how it’s been as a parent to deal with this.
– Dealing with expectations as a parent.
– Her hopes for her own life being swept away.
– Dealing with the expectations and timelines of society.
– Holding onto her faith that her son can get the best outcome
– The rewards of the journey.

Now at the age of 15 and how they’re still working through this process.
-Acknowledging the huge amounts of progress and development
– Seeing there is still more to do to achieve the goal of an independent man.

Stephanie shares her experience about how important it was to her to hunt for interventions and not feel like a victim.

How it has been a journey of accepting what we’ve been given and make the most of what life is given us. Appreciating the rewards are that this has made them both “indominable, focused and authentic”.

I hope you enjoy this episode. Have a tissue to hand. Please don’t forget to leave a review on what you think of the podcast.

If you want to listen to it play while you read the page click here:

Darius Namdaran

Darius Namdaran

Darius is a teacher and MD of BulletMap™ Studio. He's passionate about helping dyslexic children, and their parents, get through High School with their confidence intact. From his own experience with dyslexia and raising children with dyslexia he has developed an online training business designed to equip and encourage dyslexic teenagers in their journey through High School.
His company produces Mindmap videos full of tips and encouragement to help understand dyslexia and to thrive in High School.
He is the designer and senior tutor of the first Mind mapping course for Dyslexic Teenagers called the BulletMap Method.

We’d really love to hear from you so please take a moment to share your thoughts or any ways we could help you on your journey with dyslexia.

Did you enjoy the video? Watch more animated Mind Map videos and find out more about Mindmapping and Dyslexia at our Blogs

Chrissie Grant #34

The education system and dyslexia: A view from the inside and outside

Dyslexia Explored #34

Chrissie grant

Chrissie Grant

Listen to the talk while on the go from your favorite podcast app or click here to listen to this episode from iTunes. 

This episode of Dyslexia Explored, Chrissie Grant shares how she began as a support worker and then branched out into becoming a private education mentor.
 
She talks about how she started a career in acting.
 
The current state of our educational system
 
How schools wait for teenagers to fail
 
The transition from junior school to high school
 
How there’s a gap between academic tutoring and therapeutic tutoring
 
How she’s encountered so many students who think they can’t do things because they’re dyslexic
 
Bringing Hope to people who aren’t positive about their specialized thinking
 
One of the biggest challenges is helping people within the systems understand the advantages of Neurodiversity
 
Building up the link between students home and school
 
How parents often feel let down by the system, yet teachers themselves feel let down by the system because they can’t help the children the way they want to.
 
How seeing children get hooked on learning is like a drug for Chrissie and is a great reward
 
Sharing her own experience of dyspraxia and how affects her work life
 
Advice to her teacher teenage self “life is long”. Enjoy the journey you don’t have to get to the party too soon
 
Advice to herself as a parent in the future. Listen hard to your child and have mindless optimism.

If you want to listen to it play while you read the page click here:

Links you might like to check out:

 
 
Multiple Intelligence use your strengths fb group: https://www.facebook.com/multipletypesofintelligence/
 
 
 
All the apps in call Scotland: https://www.callscotland.org.uk/home/
 
  • Post it notes
  • Whiteboards
  • Mind Mapping
  • Mindfulness
  • Kindness to yourself
  • Believe in yourself
  • Music
  • Yoga
Darius Namdaran

Darius Namdaran

Darius is a teacher and MD of BulletMap™ Studio. He's passionate about helping dyslexic children, and their parents, get through High School with their confidence intact. From his own experience with dyslexia and raising children with dyslexia he has developed an online training business designed to equip and encourage dyslexic teenagers in their journey through High School.
His company produces Mindmap videos full of tips and encouragement to help understand dyslexia and to thrive in High School.
He is the designer and senior tutor of the first Mind mapping course for Dyslexic Teenagers called the BulletMap Method.

We’d really love to hear from you so please take a moment to share your thoughts or any ways we could help you on your journey with dyslexia.

Did you enjoy the video? Watch more animated Mind Map videos and find out more about Mindmapping and Dyslexia at our Blogs

Christine Robenalt #33

Physical therapist finds how dyslexia helps + hinders her work: Through her son.

Dyslexia Explored #33

Christine Robenalt

Listen to Christine Robenalt, a physical therapist, a Barton reading instructor and a mum of 2 dyslexic children from Colorado share her dyslexia story. 

Christine Robenalt

Listen to the talk while on the go from your favorite podcast app or click here to listen to this episode from iTunes. 

If you want to listen to it play while you read the page click here:

Darius Namdaran

Darius Namdaran

Darius is a teacher and MD of BulletMap™ Studio. He's passionate about helping dyslexic children, and their parents, get through High School with their confidence intact. From his own experience with dyslexia and raising children with dyslexia he has developed an online training business designed to equip and encourage dyslexic teenagers in their journey through High School.
His company produces Mindmap videos full of tips and encouragement to help understand dyslexia and to thrive in High School.
He is the designer and senior tutor of the first Mind mapping course for Dyslexic Teenagers called the BulletMap Method.

We’d really love to hear from you so please take a moment to share your thoughts or any ways we could help you on your journey with dyslexia.

Did you enjoy the video? Watch more animated Mind Map videos and find out more about Mindmapping and Dyslexia at our Blogs

Stick Shift Thinkers

What is the difference between dyslexics and normal thinkers?

Imagine learning to drive a manual stick shift car but your teacher only knows how to drive an automatic car. Naturally confusions would occur. The teacher expects you to go into drive and step on the gas to move. However, manual cars doesn’t work that way.

Watch the video where I explain the analogy much better.

Stick Shift Thinker
A Mind Map of the Stick Shift Thinker video

When it comes to learning to read and learning to study, how do dyslexics and normal thinkers differentiate?

It’s like the difference between a manual car and an automatic car. An automatic car can directly step on drive mode and the car runs smoothly. If you got a manual car, you have to go through one gear to the other to run flawlessly. A manual or stick shift thinker needs to go to first gear before shifting to the second.

Imagine your a manual thinker learning to drive but the person teaching you only knows how to drive an automatic car. The teacher would say “go into drive and then put on the gas”. Gleefully, you would say “okay! I’ve got it.” stepping heavy on first gear. Then when you get to the corner, it stopped! What happened? Your teacher would say “I don’t know. There must be something wrong with your car.”

In real life, if you were driving a manual car you would put your foot down on the clutch and stop yourself stalling. But let’s say you’re still on first gear putting your foot on the gas revving at 30 miles an hour. If you went whole day driving 30 miles an hour in first gear, putting a lot of stress into your car, you’ll eventually overheat or stall in the middle. You will wonder if there’s something wrong with your car. You did everything the teacher told you but its not enough. You are still struggling while the other cars pass you with ease.

Imagine someone got in and told you that you’re a stick shift car. One out of ten cars is a stick shift car. One out of ten is dyslexic. They’re manual thinkers when it comes to learning how to read and learning how to study so they need to be taught how to go up each and every gear. They don’t just push it in. They have to do that clutch control and their gas. They have to move around and make these decisions on the road so it takes a bit longer to learn how to drive. It doesn’t mean once you learn how to drive, your car is less powerful or slower. There are stick shift Ferraris as well as automatic. It’s down to driving ability and style. Sometimes a stick shift is better than an automatic. Racing car drivers have better control with a stick shift.

You don’t get to choose what kind of thinking style you have. Dyslexia is not a selection. It is already chosen for you.

If you’re dyslexic thinker you’re a systematic thinker. You need to systematically go up these four or five gears and keep making decisions according to your environment. You can’t be taught that by someone who only knows automatic. You need to be taught this particular little part of reading or studying by someone who’s used to going up the gears instead of just going in to drive.

Now once you learn how to go up and down the gears when it comes to reading or studying, the driving instructor can tell you about roadcraft and directions where to go. It could be a geography teacher teaching you about geography or math teacher teaching math. You need that simple skill of shifting gears manually as compared to automatic. You need to learn the system and break it down into individual gears.

Does that mean that you’re manual at everything you do? No. You might be manual at reading, writing or studying but you might be automatic when it comes to higher level things like creating and designing things. Others might struggle in the creative process. They might not go past the first gear when it comes to designing a product or creating something.

As a dyslexic when it comes to reading and writing we’re manual thinkers. Unfortunately, at school, you have to be good at reading and studying. You need someone to get in the car with you and show you how to do the gears.

I hope that helps a little bit. Understand that dyslexia is not about how smart you are. It’s more like having a stick shift in a place where automatic is the norm. Everybody assumes you have the same transmission so If you get wrong, stalling in the middle of the road, people will naturally blame you for not learning the right way- their way. They conclude that you are lazy or slow. When in fact your car stalled or overheated. Using the first gear, you’ve not learned how to go up the other gears to ease the engine. At the end of the day, you are so exhausted for using the first gear all the time in a manual transmission.

What do you think? Let us know on the comments below.

FREE WEBINAR:

How To Equip Dyslexic Children To Thrive In School

BulletMap Academy Logo

We’d really love to hear from you so please take a moment to share your thoughts or any ways we could help you on your journey with dyslexia.

Did you enjoy the video? Watch more animated Mind Map videos and find out more about Mindmapping and Dyslexia at our Blogs

Cathy Magee #32

How dyslexia impacts adults and children

Dyslexia Explored #32

Cathy magee

If your Scottish and involved in Dyslexia, this is one to listen to! Also, if your involved in a dyslexia group, there is a lot to learn from how Dyslexia Scotland has grown over the last 50 yrs. 

In this episode we explore the story of Dyslexia Scotland and all the things it can teach us about dyslexia itself and also other groups who help with dyslexia. It all began in 1968 with parent support groups and volunteers. Two main dyslexia organizations developed. The Scottish dyslexia trust, which gave grants and the other “Dyslexia in Scotland” which was about volunteer parents.

Cathy Magee

Listen to the talk while on the go from your favorite podcast app or click here to listen to this episode from iTunes. 

Cathy explains how in 2002 Jackie Stewart the famous formula 1 racing champion, helped pull together both these organizations into one, called Dyslexia Scotland in 2004.

Jackie Stewart found he was dyslexic through his teenage son being identified and is the President of Dyslexia Scotland and Vice President Of the British Dyslexia Association. 

Cathy explains how the biggest challenge that Dyslexia Scotland faced was how to raise the awareness and solutions to the 500,000 adults and children with dyslexia in Scotland and maintaining that wide scope.

We go into depth on the huge range of different things that are available through dyslexia Scotland and also some of the interesting challenges that are unexpected with dyslexia for adults in the workplace doing driving tests and so much more.

If you want to listen to it play while you read the page click here:

Links you might like to 

Dyslexia Scotland leaflets (there are 38 in total, all free to download and arranged in categories for different groups):

https://www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk/our-leaflets

Our 3 websites:

www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk (general about all our services, support, information, for anyone with dyslexia and those who support/employ dyslexic people)

www.addressingdyslexia.org (Toolkit for teachers)

www.unwrapped.dyslexiascotland.org.uk (website for dyslexic children and young people aged 8-18)

Social Media channels:

Facebook

Twitter

Youtube

Instagram

Our Blog, A Life less ordinary

Our Helpline: https://www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk/helpline

Monday to Thursday 10am to 4:30pm
Friday 10am to 4pm

How to contact the Helpline:
Telephone: 0344 800 84 84
Email: helpline@dyslexiascotland.org.uk

Linkedin: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/cathy-magee-06b63a58

Dyslexia Explored episodes: bulletmapstudio.com/dyslexia-explored-podcast/

Mindmapping course: www.bulletmapstudio.com/bulletmap/

Free SundayMap course: www.bulletmapstudio.com/sundaymap/

And www.bulletmapstudio.com/32/

Darius Namdaran

Darius Namdaran

Darius is a teacher and MD of BulletMap™ Studio. He's passionate about helping dyslexic children, and their parents, get through High School with their confidence intact. From his own experience with dyslexia and raising children with dyslexia he has developed an online training business designed to equip and encourage dyslexic teenagers in their journey through High School.
His company produces Mindmap videos full of tips and encouragement to help understand dyslexia and to thrive in High School.
He is the designer and senior tutor of the first Mind mapping course for Dyslexic Teenagers called the BulletMap Method.

We’d really love to hear from you so please take a moment to share your thoughts or any ways we could help you on your journey with dyslexia.

Did you enjoy the video? Watch more animated Mind Map videos and find out more about Mindmapping and Dyslexia at our Blogs