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I believe every dyslexic who studies successfully has an intentional study system. We need one because our brains are wired to need external systems to help us stay on track. It’s like a law of nature. So much of a dyslexic brains is wired for the strategic and creative roles. For the systematic side of life and studying we need to rely on external ‘systems’

It’s a place to bring you together with others learning to ride ‘wild horses’. We will systematically take each challenge you are going to face and show you and your teen a way that will make it faster, fun and more fruitful with study skills. The course will be weekly in two blocks, a 4 week block with a break before we do the 6 week block. We’ll meet live on video conference each week for a study group for 45 minutes. I’m going to be with you encouraging and teaching you along the way.

We all hope for the best. To actually achieve our best, we need to plan for the best. We need to plan to succeed. I’m not just talking about grades her but all areas of life.

How does a mind map do that? In our course I explain how mind mapping forces us to use our natural talents towards creative thinking within a structured map.

What is it with us dyslexics? We can have huge capacity to work one day, then the next we are overwhelmed after 10 mins. For my stressed teenage daughter, this came out in different ways. 5 mins into a study skills session she would get very agitated. Neither of us understood it at the time. She thought I was being overbearing, I thought she was being evasive. Now we realise her brain was full. More accurately, she had filled up her working memory.

We just want a nice tame horse for them to make life easier and less painful. Taming their brains may not be an option but respecting how their brains work and learning to ride bareback is definitely doable. Your dyslexic teen will need to learn a way of riding that allows a balance between freedom and control. This is what proper use of the mind mapping does.

What is it with us dyslexics? We can have huge capacity to work one day, then the next we are overwhelmed after 10 mins. For my stressed teenage daughter, this came out in different ways. 5 mins into a study skills session she would get very agitated. Neither of us understood it at the time. She thought I was being overbearing, I thought she was being evasive. Now we realise her brain was full. More accurately, she had filled up her working memory.

When I asked her to get her Biology folder out, I knew it would be an uphill climb. All her papers were crammed randomly. The rest were in piles underneath her clothes. My heart went out to her. I knew this was dyslexia and she just didn’t have the skills to compensate for her organisational weaknesses. 

I remember the day we noticed our daughter sinking in High School. She said her English teacher was commenting that she wasn’t trying hard enough. My daughter was an ‘A’ student until then. She had had some challenges in junior school but a small private school and an expert teacher had sorted those. Or so we thought.

In this video we’re talking about succeeding at exams even if you think you have a terrible memory. Exams are a combination of understanding your subject and remembering some key facts. That remembering can be really hard for a dyslexic but there is hope! I really wish there was something like a memory pill. That’s why I’ve used the shape of a pill as the central image. I’m dyslexic and I struggle with my memory and even though I try really hard I can’t remember names, faces, dates or the order of things. I’ve had to work really hard to find ways to compensate such as checklists, notepads, systems and Standard Operating Procedures for the business.

This video is about Stan Gloss living with dyslexia. Stan Gloss is an entrepreneur with dyslexia who is the founder and CEO of BIOTEAM, a multimillion dollar company which creates supercomputers. I’m summarising a great article by understood.org which is well worth a read.

This video is all about how dyslexia shaped IKEA. It has a VW beetle with lots of boxes on its roof as the central image as we all know that with IKEA, you’re tempted to buy so much and load your car up with it all! The story begins with a Swedish boy who struggled at school with reading and writing. In spite of his difficulties he ended up performing well in his studies and this may well have been because his father rewarded him financially!

High School can be a difficult environment for creatives and dyslexics because of the way subjects are taught and the sheer volume of information that needs to be remembered. This video is all about seven High School challenges mind mapping can help with.

Daymond John is the founder of FUBU clothing and an investor on Shark Tank. In a Business Insider podcast he gives an insight of his success and how it happened. I’ve summarised the podcast here. Daymond John starts by describing the shock of his stage 2 cancer diagnosis and his gratitude at its safe removal. He says that being healthy again reinvigorated his drive.  Daymond continues to encourage people to get checked for early detection and loves how that can save lives.

In this video and blog post we’re looking at how important the words of affirmation and encouragement that parents and teachers speak are to a dyslexic child. Laura Schifter tells of how she would sit and read with her sisters and prefer the pictures stories because she couldn’t read the words so well. She would sometimes memorise the stories and pretend to read them. Her peers laughed at her when she tried to read out loud at school and eventually she was assessed for dyslexia.

This video is a way for me to share with you how a dyslexic brain works. I call my brain a zero-gravity space. Let me explain what I mean by that using an illustration and a mindmap. Imagine my brain is a workshop and in that workshop is a table. My teacher comes along and teaches me something and it’s like placing an item onto the table. He tells me all about it and I put in into my workshop. What’s the first thing I do with it as a dyslexic? I take it apart! I pull it to pieces in my imagination and try to figure out how it works. This helps me try and understand the new thing that has come into my workshop.

In this introduction to teenage dyslexia I want to tell you about John who is 13 years old and dyslexic and what a typical day looks like for him. John sleeps through his alarm and his mum has to wake him up. He wakes up tired and can often feel quite emotional in the mornings. His room is more messy than a typical teenager’s bedroom and his morning’s are always rushed. He’s just in time for the school bus and everything feels like he manages it ‘just in time.’ John’s bag is huge and heavy because he can’t remember what he needs to take for each day so he just carries everything around in case he needs it.

If I’m dyslexic, am I disabled or is the system disabled? I’ve been pondering this question recently. In the UK, and in a lot of different countries worldwide, if you’re dyslexic then you are given the category of ‘disabled.’  When I went to University ten years ago for the second time I was assessed for dyslexia and was diagnosed as being significantly dyslexic. The assessor said that I now had the rights of a disabled person. This felt really strange to me because I was as intelligent as the people around me but because I had the ‘label’ of dyslexia I now had a disability.

I’ve been pondering a bit about why we have the ratio of 1/10 dyslexics in our society. What the reason? Sometimes it’s described as a problem but I think it’s an essential part of society, business and communities. I think society needs one in ten people to be dyslexic. Here’s why. Dyslexic people are often the ideas people in a situation. If you find that you’re the ‘ideas person’ in a room, then you’re probably the dyslexic, whether you know it or not. There’s a reason why you need to be in that room! Dyslexic people have a hardwired ability to come up with innovative solutions to problems and to see connections that other people miss. This has been established by research and by history.

One of the best things about teaching is seeing the improvements of your students from day one until they finish.  At Mindmap Studio, as we ran our pilot course for Mind Mapping for High School with Dyslexia, we had the pleasure of getting to know the students and families more and to hear how learning to mindmap was really making a difference for them.

If I’m dyslexic, am I disabled or is the system disabled? I’ve been pondering this question recently. In the UK, and in a lot of different countries worldwide, if you’re dyslexic then you are given the category of ‘disabled.’  When I went to University ten years ago for the second time I was assessed for dyslexia and was diagnosed as being significantly dyslexic. The assessor said that I now had the rights of a disabled person. This felt really strange to me because I was as intelligent as the people around me but because I had the ‘label’ of dyslexia I now had a disability.

Here’s my quick release headphone trick! We all know how frustrating tangled headphones are when you need them and how much hassle it can be. This simple trick means your headphones are always tangle free. Like so many skills in life, It looks simple when you see it done. But you often just need a little bit of help to know the steps to make what looks simple actually work. It’s the same with Mindmapping. It can look simple but you need help and practice to make it work. In this course I will show you how to Mindmap your thoughts.

This is a moment to reflect on what we’ve learnt so far in the process of developing a way to teach mindmapping to dyslexic teenagers and their families. I started the process with six months of research into how to produce online courses that teach mindmapping. I have a course on Udemy, as a result of that research, and it is doing quite well. The next twelve months were spent developing a course that was specific to dyslexic teenagers and their parents. Once that course was filmed and ready we decided to do a test run with a group of ten families.

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10 Things To Do A Night Before An Exam

Are you feeling ready for your exams? Many students panic about what to do when exams are approaching. Here at Mindmap Studio, we understand that, so we have made a Mindmap of things that can help you prepare for your exam. We’ve also created a checklist of everything we talk about in the video so that you can download it as a preparation tool. Here’s the video of 10 things to do the night before an exam to maximize the results of the next day. We hope you find it useful.

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5 Basics Of Mind Mapping

Mind mapping is a visual way of taking notes. Mind mapping is ideal for visual thinkers, dyslexics, people studying for exams, and teenagers studying and learning how to learn and remember lots of information. In drawing a mind map, it is recommended to use the five basics: A central image, curving branches, keywords, colour and images. 

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Richard Branson's Story: Profit + Dyslexia

Richard Branson is a very well known dyslexic and this is one of my favourite stories about him. You can find the original story as part of a TED Talk and at Friends of Quinn’s YouTube channel. It tells of how Richard Branson learnt about net profit when he was 50 years old and already head of a huge group of companies in Europe. The story is full of insights into Branson, into dyslexia, into entrepreneurship itself and how to connect with dyslexics and teach them. I’m going try and unpack some of this here and share how I would apply this to working with dyslexic teenagers.

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Teenage Dyslexia: Spotting It At Home

Spotting dyslexia is not always easy. In this video, we’re going to talk about teenage dyslexia and how you might notice it as the parent of a teenager in High school. We’re going to talk about it from the parent’s point of view, from a teen point of view and some of the signs of dyslexia.

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What Is Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a learning ‘difference’ – classified as a disability in UK. Dyslexia can affect the way people communicate, and is different for everyone. It is not just about reading and writing and it has nothing to do with intelligence. There is no ‘cure’ but lots of practical things can help overcome some of the barriers it presents. It is estimated that 1 in 10 people has dyslexia. Dyslexia exists in all cultures and across the range of abilities and backgrounds. Dyslexia often runs in the family.

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Is It Worth Understanding

Today we’re talking about whether it is worth understanding teenage dyslexia. There are lots of teachers and professionals in your teenager’s life so it can seem easier to leave it to them to actually understand what’s going on and we can just be the support act. My answer is: YES! Its really worth understanding teenage dyslexia and there are a variety of reasons why I think this.

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Meet Your Guide

My dyslexia was diagnosed when I was a child so I know about being a teenager with dyslexia. I passed my exams and came here, to Edinburgh, and got my law degree. I’ve gone on to run businesses and community projects and I’m now a parent to teenagers who have dyslexia and I’ve taught them the study skills that have helped me and they have thrived at school and passed their exams well. I’ve become an expert in mind mapping as I’ve been mind mapping for over 20 years and have developed that skill extensively and teach it to others. I’m an expert in my own dyslexia but not in the broader field of dyslexia and I really want to learn more. These videos are part of my journey to learning more and I’m hoping that as I share them you’ll pick up invaluable information and knowledge that will help with your own child.

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Why Hitchhiking

Dyslexics are known for out of the box thinking, random thinking, often being scatty, good at improvisation and being adaptable. They don’t often go in straight lines. They don’t often think in straight lines or plan in straight lines or work in straight lines or travel in straight lines. We’ll explore a little bit more of why this is later in the course. Hitchhiking can be described in similar ways. Most standard travel plans involve a fixed destination with a well defined route whereas in hitchhiking, although your destination may well be fixed, you stick your thumb out and your route develops as you travel depending on the lifts you get.

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The Road Map

If you imagine that right now I have a a big road map of where I think I’d like to go on this journey and I also have lots of little destinations that I’d like to check in on along the way so that we can explore various resources as we travel. I’ve experienced dyslexia as a teeanger and I’m now the parent of teenagers with dyslexia. In addition to my own experience I now want to explore teenage dyslexia more thoroughly so that I can understand it more and help others navigate it and understands it too. This video series is my way of visually sharing my journey.

Hitchhikers Guide to Dyslexia Invitation

MindMap Studio has taken on the challenge to produce 30 videos in 30 days for parents with dyslexic teenagers in High school. The aim of these videos is to be a help and a guide as you parent and encourage teenagers with dyslexia. This short video explains more about this challenge. We will showcase existing dyslexia resources from blogs, podcasts, videos, websites and books and transform them into animated and time-lapse video. If you are a parent of a dyslexic teenager then these videos are ideal for you and your child, especially if they’re in High school doing exams.

About Us:

Darius is an Edupreneur, MD of Bulletmap™ Studio. Passionate about helping Dyslexic Teenagers, and parents, get through High School with their confidence intact. His company produces engaging Mindmap explainer videos. He is senior Tutor of the first Mindmapping course for Dyslexic Teenagers.

Podcast Show Notes:

What Is Dyslexia

Are you feeling ready for your exams? Many students panic about what to do when exams are approaching. Here at Mindmap Studio, we understand that, so we have made a Mindmap of things that can help you prepare for your exam. We’ve also created a checklist of everything we talk about in the video so that you can download it as a preparation tool.

Is It Worth Understanding

Are you feeling ready for your exams? Many students panic about what to do when exams are approaching. Here at Mindmap Studio, we understand that, so we have made a Mindmap of things that can help you prepare for your exam. We’ve also created a checklist of everything we talk about in the video so that you can download it as a preparation tool.

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