What Have We Learned In The Course

Preparation for the course launch

This is a moment to reflect on what we’ve learnt so far in the process of developing a way to teach mindmapping to dyslexic teenagers and their families.

 I started the process with six months of research into how to produce online courses that teach mindmapping. I have a course on Udemy, as a result of that research, and it is doing quite well. 

Pilot Course

The next twelve months were spent developing a course that was specific to dyslexic teenagers and their parents. Once that course was filmed and ready we decided to do a test run with a group of ten families.

What Have We Learned In The Course

After completing this pilot course and getting the feedback from the families I’ve learnt that with tutoring completion rates rise to 80%. Up from 10% when its video only. But what’s more important is that they really develop the skill.

why live tutoring?

My goal is to get teenagers learning and using mindmapping in everyday life and not just getting their parents to buy a course that isn’t used.

What I discovered through the pilot course was the importance of combining a video course with tutoring. Online group tutoring by video was crucial so that it could fit into everyday life. One of the challenges for the parents of a dyslexic child is that you’re spending so much additional time on homework, speaking to school staff, that when it comes to one more thing, even if it’s going to be useful, can feel like it will be too much.

So how do you fit learning how to mindmap into an already busy life?

The answer that I’ve come up with is one hour of videos to watch on the internet in your own time and then a 45min group coaching session via video conference, which is where they get live feedback and often when the “ah, ha!” moments kick in.

top5 basics for mindmapping

We created a course with one hour of videos and a one hour tutorial per week and that seemed to be the ideal combination for getting people to actually complete the course. Our completion rates went from 12% completion with online videos only to 80% when we combined the videos with tutoring. What was of even more value to me was knowing that my students could actually mindmap in a way that is productive for them in the long term. They can use mindmaps to improve their exam results and then take the skill into the future lives.

The next question was, ‘How well are the students actually mindmapping?’

The pilot course ran for eight weeks and I realised that after four weeks they were mindmapping well and had learnt the core, foundational mindmapping skills. The next four weeks were focused on how to mindmap for exam revision.

our journey

On reflection, this was probably too much in one go and so we’ve split the course into two parts. A four week course to learn how to mindmap which you can then practice for a few months and then a further four week course to learn how to mindmap for exam revision. They are two quite different skill sets and suit being two different courses.

That’s been our learning journey so far!

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10 Things To Do The Night Before an Exam

10 THINGS TO DO THE NIGHT BEFORE AN EXAM

EXAMS ARE COMING!

And you feeling ready for your exams? Many students panic about what to do when exams are approaching. Here at BulletMap Studio, we understand that, so we have made a Mindmap of things that can help you prepare for your exam. We’ve also created a checklist of everything we talk about in the video so that you can download it as a preparation tool.

Here’s the video of 10 things to do the night before an exam to maximize the results of the next day. We hope you find it useful.

10thingstodobeforeexambranch1

PREPARE

  1. Prepare everything you’re going to need in advance. This means you’re not rushing around in the morning and feeling flustered.
    • Pack your Bag with everything that you need for your exam;
      • Pen and pencils (make sure you have a spare pen)
      • Revision notes
      • Calculator
      • Water Bottle
      • Tissues
    • Lay-out your clothes. Choose something comfortable.
    • Decide what you’ll have for breakfast and have it ready as much as possible.
  2. Set an alarm for the next day an hour earlier than usual. This means that you don’t need to rush and there is plenty of time to eat breakfast, go through your notes and get to exam in good time.

VISUALIZE

3. Visualize positive images of yourself in the exam. Imagine yourself sitting down, answering the questions and feeling positive about you’ve written. Imagine getting everything right on the day. This really helps deal with your nerves in advance. 

4. Remind yourself of all the work you’ve done to get to this point. Think about the revision you’ve done and the past papers and have confidence that it will pay off.

5. Have a final focus on the big picture of the subject. Think about what you do know rather than what you don’t know. Take time to draw out your Memory mind map once more.

10thingstodobeforeexambranch2

Balance

6. Eat well the night before. Food is fuel and a good, balanced meal gives your body lots of energy to work with. Avoid caffeine, sugary stuff and alcohol and keep well hydrated with water.

7. Plan a reward for after the exam. Have something to look forward to after a hard day so you can treat yourself for a job well done.

switch off

8. Set a deadline for when you’re going to stop studying. Having a deadline gives you time to relax and means you don’t become too mentally drained the night before the exam. 

9. Switch off and relax. Once you’ve reached your study deadline, take some time to unwind and de-stress. This could be light stretching, playing or listening to music, drawing or coloring or even an episode of something on Netflix (but don’t binge watch!)

Sleep

10. Get some sleep. A good sleep can actually help you study because it improves your creativity, problem-solving, concentration and memory. Studying late into the night will reduce mental performance the next day. You will also feel sleepy and weak in the exam.

That’s our top ten tips to help you prepare for your exams. Do you have any others of your own? If you do please share them in the comments. We’d love to hear them.

Checklist

We’ve also created a checklist  based on this video that could help you or your child to prepare for each exams. If you or your child is dyslexic then you may find you have poor working memory. Checklists are a great way to overcome this and this could be a helpful tool in your exam preparation.

You can download the ready to print 10 Things to Do the Night Before an Exam PDF version here.

MINDMAP STUDIO

Did you like the animated Mind Map? Check out our other Mind Maps videos made by BulletMap Studio

Studying and remembering can be a real challenge to a dyslexic. This can be become particularly apparent especially in High School years with the sheer volume of studying required and when there are exams to navigate. 

Learning to organize your thoughts and to be productive with what you have learned is a very valuable life skill. Mind mapping is a very powerful way to make sense of what you are learning and to be able to recall it in the future. The visual, organic style of a mind map plays to the strengths of dyslexia. It is a skill that can be learned and once you start to use  Mind mapping it can save you a great deal of time and stress.

Here at BulletMap Studio, we offer tutorial courses that help High School students with dyslexia use Mind Mapping as an effective tool to studyimprove memory skills, organize notes and revise successfully for exams.

10 things to do before an exam mindmap full

Available resources

10 Things to Do the Night Before an Exam Map: PDF | Video

10 Things to Do the Night Before an Exam Checklist: PDF 

Did you enjoy the video? Watch more animated Mindmap videos like this? Please click here.

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Darius Namdaran

Darius Namdaran

Darius is a teacher and MD of BulletMap™ Studio. He's passionate about helping dyslexic children, and their parents, get through High School with their confidence intact. From his own experience with dyslexia and raising children with dyslexia he has developed an online training business designed to equip and encourage dyslexic teenagers in their journey through High School.
His company produces Mindmap videos full of tips and encouragement to help understand dyslexia and to thrive in High School.
He is the designer and senior tutor of the first Mind mapping course for Dyslexic Teenagers called the BulletMap Method.

 

PARENT’S GUIDE TO MIND MAPPING

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